Saturday, May 21, 2011

Welcome to Obamakare

These are the same people who are going to be running your .GOV health care bureaucracy.

"Our return was processed February 19 with a refund date of March 4. Well, March 4 came and went. Since then we have been waiting, every other week we have a different error code and the date of a possible direct deposit," she said. "On April 27 they told me they told me my return was done and 'out of error.' Last week they told me I should receive it May 20. Then (Wednesday) I looked and it's gone back into error again."

Lemons said the IRS has devoted a lot of extra labor toward solving the problem and began manually processing the returns after the problem was discovered in February. The number of victims has been whittled to "a few thousand taxpayers," he said.


Because unelected, uncaring and irresponsible drones care more than business people about making things work.

"I had a date, and a second date ... and now I'm back at 1201 (error). My advocate said that it's just sitting there. WTF IRS?" Jannae Leonard Powell wrote Thursday.

The Facebook page has become a support group for some, a place where taxpayers share tips on the best time to call , the best number to call and how to reach the most helpful phone agents. Littlejohn said many in the group have received frequent rude treatment, so they just hang up repeatedly until a "nice" agent answers.

"Some are very nice, but some are very nasty and basically say, 'I don't know what else to tell you. You are just going have to wait,'" she said.


AND we all know how fleet-footed and agile any behemoth is when it come to something... UNEXPECTED, like ummm...everything this administration sees.

All the taxpayers involved in the glitch took advantage of a one-time, misnamed First Time Homebuyer tax “credit” offered during the 2008 tax year, a program that turned out to be a meager effort by Congress to prop up the then-imploding housing market. Homebuyers who took advantage didn't actually receive a credit — they were granted what was essentially an interest-free loan of up to $7,500, to be paid back in $500 increments starting in 2010. Subsequent versions of the program granted homebuyers an outright tax credit, so the 2008 users already have something to moan about.

Lemons said IRS systems weren't set up to handle the many variables that ultimately came from the program, such as how to calculate repayment of the loans if buyers got divorced, or ended up in foreclosure. One particularly vexing and unexpected problem: Many taxpayers are paying more than the minimum $500 annual payment in an effort to pay off the loan early.

"That has complicated matters," he said. "These are well-intentioned homeowners, but our initial programming was that payments would be spread out equally over 15 years." Programmers of complex systems will understand this as a typical problem of "unexpected input."

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